Monday, July 21, 2008

2007 Rookie of the Year

The competition for the 2007 Rookie of the Year was stiff. Many of those nominated, including reps I've interviewed here previously, doubled the business in their territory.

For me, it's exciting to think back on my initial interview with these people. They were standouts, even then: in addition to have great sales skills, they also showed desire, drive, and a hunger for an opportunity to prove themselves.

The opportunity is what they focused on, and when they got it, they did not waste a moment. They threw themselves into it wholeheartedly and made the most of it.

Today I will be interviewing the rep who won Rookie of the Year.

11 comments:

Lisa McCallister-Grant said...

I still have a copy of your resume from when I originally interviewed you. I was looking at my notes and remembered you said something like, "I don't care how much business there is in the territory, just give me a chance to grow it."
You were focused on the opportunity. A lot of people would shy from the momentous challenge of taking on an underdeveloped territory in a very competitive area. Why weren't you?

GMAN said...

I am very self-driven with a large entrepreneurial spirit. I am one that does not like things given to me. Therefore, looking at the past year has been very humbling and fruitful due to the benefits I have provided my clients.

Lisa McCallister-Grant said...

I think you hit on something very key- entrepreneurial.

You came from a pharma background, although you had anything but a "pharma mindset". When I talked to your references, I got the sense that perhaps you were a little too aggressive for pharma (to which I though- GREAT!)

From my perspective, one of the reasons pharma reps don't "cross over well" is that they too often focus on things like expenses,lunches, dinners etc instead of the uncapped, entrepreneurial opportunity to grow their own business.

So tell me, when you were considering the position representing Linvatec, what was your thinking? What was your focus?

GMAN said...

Even though my pharma experience was for a short time (3-4yrs)on multiple levels, I had always looked at the big picture. I wanted to have accomplishments that I had myself accountable for, based on my own skills vs. a large group or ones dictated by various pharma policies, prescription plans or who I took out that evening. My focus was to exceed my own goals and financial potential (which I have and then some).

Lisa McCallister-Grant said...

At the awards dinner, they highlighted that in 2 years, you brought 12 surgeons to labs to learn more about our products.
First, at what point does it make sense to invite a surgeon to a lab and how do you approach them with the idea?
And second, how important has this been to growing your business?

GMAN said...

When I approach physician to attend our lab, I was certain I had a platform to communicate with them on. On a personal and professional level. I based my clients on the volume the were doing or expected to do as well as the tenure in the community. Looking at these qualitifications, I invited them to the lab (via personal invites I made or email). The follow-up (like anything) is the key. Which led to multiple capital and everyday sales plus a bond that will last a life-time in this business.

Lisa McCallister-Grant said...

What advice would you give someone who wants to be successful in medical device sales? (Maybe even a rookie of the year?)

GMAN said...

Stay focused at the longterm goal you set for yourself. Be true to your clients and you. Finally, WORK WORK WORK but remember to have some playtime for you and family.

Lisa McCallister-Grant said...

A lot of people profess to find he operating room interesting, but it's a complex, demanding environment where you have to be "on your game".

Tell me a little bit about how you finesse that environment, and uncover new opportunities while you are in the O.R.?

GMAN said...

Yes, you have to be always on your game. Its like being up at bat with the bases loaded in Game 7 of the World Series. You must expect any pitch-anytime and adapt to the situation. Furthermore, must be attentive to your peripheral players i.e. nurse, anesthesia, circulator etc. During that time they are a great source of everyday information on things breaking, new equipment trialing, items needed, new Drs in town etc. This is the opportunity to sell yourself - which can win over the CROWD.

Lisa McCallister-Grant said...

Your success has been very well deserved. You think big, you dream big, and you make it happen. I'm glad you are on our team.
Thanks for your time, and talk to you again soon!